Purpose or Perish

PurposePerish

Let’s be honest and admit that Western civilization has lost its sense of purpose. Western man has nowhere he’s going, has no great goal to accomplish. As a result, he and she have become listless, disappointed, and frustrated. Some still imagine that “democracy” will somehow ennoble them, but more are realizing the world model forced upon them was a patchwork of lies… that it has left them lost in the thickets.

Sadly, millions of people have never experienced this:

When you are inspired by some great purpose, some extraordinary project, all your thoughts break their bonds: Your mind transcends limitations, your consciousness expands in every direction, and you find yourself in a new, great and wonderful world. Dormant forces, faculties and talents become alive, and you discover yourself to be a greater person by far than you ever dreamed yourself to be.((This passage comes from an Indian philosopher named Patanjali.))

That’s how we are meant to live, and it requires a great purpose. None of the preapproved, mundane, collectivized purposes we’re fed by authority will do; this must be something that we care about by individual choice. Each of us has to see the goal independently, make the choice alone, and act without permission.

To illustrate this further, here are some thoughts from G.K. Chesterton:

Vigorous organisms talk not about their processes, but about their aims. There cannot be any better proof of the physical efficiency of a man than that he talks cheerfully of a journey to the end of the world…

… this great gap in modern ethics, the absence of vivid pictures of purity and spiritual triumph….

So, we need a purpose… a clear, large, difficult, and supremely noble purpose… one that engages us, body, soul, and spirit. And I have one to propose.

Our Amazing Opportunity

If you can pull yourself out of the 24/7 news fear cycle, the world view you learned in school, and the irrational superstition that politics actually helps us, an amazing sight appears before you:

Humanity is ready to transcend scarcity forever.

Yeah, I know, by all that’s holy in authorized mind-space, this is “ridiculous.” The people who’ve actually studied it, however, disagree.

Do you know who Norman Borlaug was? Probably not; I didn’t either until he died. Norman Borlaug saved a billion people from starvation. A billion. How? By more or less inventing modern agriculture. When crop yields double or triple, suddenly a whole lot of poor people have enough to eat.

So, coming back to my vision of trouncing scarcity once and for all, here’s what Mr. Borlaug said in September 2000:

I now say that the world has the technology – either available or well advanced in the research pipeline – to feed on a sustainable basis a population of 10 billion people. The more pertinent question today is whether farmers and ranchers will be permitted to use this new technology.

And Mr. Borlaug wasn’t alone. Julian Simon, who made a career of analyzing such things, wrote this in 1995:

We now have in our hands – in our libraries, really – the technology to feed, clothe, and supply energy to an ever-growing population for the next seven billion years.

If you want further info on this, see an article I wrote here, or several issues of my subscription newsletter.

The point is this: We already know how to feed, clothe, and comfortably house every human being on the planet. That’s no longer even disputable. No, we don’t actually do this, but we absolutely know how. And get this: There’s no longer any actual need to fight over resources.

Yes, I know this is heresy. Every right-thinking person knows that a war of all against all is eternal. Except that it’s not. It’s a lie that became a self-fulfilling prophecy. Large civilizations have lived peacefully for periods of a thousand or even two thousand years. Not possible? It happened!

So, are we less evolved than the people who lived peacefully 3,000 years ago? No, we’re not, but we’ve listened to the worst control freaks and believed their fear-porn.

Here, again to make our point, is R. Buckminster Fuller, who devoted his life to this subject:

We can now take care of everybody at a higher standard of living than anybody has ever known. It does not have to be “you or me,” so selfishness is unnecessary and war is obsolete. This has never been done before.

Our problem is no longer knowledge, or even resources. Our central problem is simply cooperation. And this will remain a problem so long as governments control humanity. Think of it this way:

Can you imagine a worse structure for cooperation than one that enforces “obey or we’ll hurt you”?

That’s precisely what governments do, and it’s the central reason people are still starving and homeless.

We can most definitely do better. But to do it, we’ll have to go around governments, “respected international organizations,” and the entire mindscape these hierarchies have spun. We have the science, now we need the will to use it.

So…

A purpose for the ages lies before us. Either we pick up such a vision and act upon it, or else (whether slowly or swiftly) we perish… and perhaps deserve to perish.

* * * * *

If you’ve enjoyed Free-Man’s Perspective or A Lodging of Wayfaring Men, you’re going to love Paul Rosenberg’s new novel, The Breaking Dawn.

It begins with an attack that crashes the investment markets, brings down economic systems, and divides the world. One part is dominated by mass surveillance and massive data systems: clean cities and empty minds… where everything is assured and everything is ordered. The other part is abandoned, without services, with limited communications, and shoved 50 years behind the times… but where human minds are left to find their own bearings.

You may never look at life the same way again.

Get it now at Amazon ($18.95) or on Kindle: ($5.99)

TheBreakingDawn

* * * * *

Paul Rosenberg
www.freemansperspective.com

How to Speak to the Brainwashed

brainwashedLast week, I posted an article entitled “Man Is Not Always Blind.” And quite understandably, I received comments from readers who disagreed. After all, when you are surrounded by people who wish to not see – who hate you for trying to make them see – it is natural to take that opinion.

(And since the word is so often fitting, I will go with “brainwashed” to describe those who wish not to see.)

But rather than debating “Is it getting any better?” I’d like to move on to actually making things better. And that means talking to people.

So, since there is something of an art to speaking to the brainwashed, I will direct the rest of this article to that art.

To Begin

Let’s start by removing the divide: You and I have made the same mistakes these people are making. We may be a few steps ahead of them in leaving the swamp, but we started in the same swamp with them.

In all of human history, there may be no greater conditioning system than our modern government schools (including all the private schools that follow the same pattern). From infancy to adulthood, it affects most human minds in the West. And I dare guess that 98% of my readers bear its scars.

So, you must start by understanding that these “brainwashed” people have spent a huge portion of their lives inside a massive mind-warp. Don’t be too quick to toss them aside. Learn patience. Breaking out of their mold is scary, and it takes time.

The Roots

The roots are deep and old; they are backed up with violence and fear. It comes down to this:

The very existence of the state requires you to be brainwashed.

Every state (communist, fascist, theocratic, whatever) rests on the concept of legitimacy:

It is right that one group of men take everyone else’s money by force and tell them what to do.

It is right that they punish or kill anyone who doesn’t obey them.

It is right that they send your children to die fighting their competitors.

If I wanted to apply this to Marvin and Bob who live down the street, you’d tell me I was crazy, and you would be right.

Why, then, is this same idea holy and glorious when applied to brigands and deceivers, as it has been for some 6,000 years?

The usual response to such a question, by the way, is this:

<sound of crickets>

And please notice that this is precisely the way to phrase things to the brainwashed. You have to create moments of clarity.

Sometimes it will work, and a seed will be planted. Other times, they’ll hate your guts for forcing them into punishable thoughts.

The One-Size-Fits-All Answer

I don’t care how trite this may sound, but the right way to get through to the brainwashed is simply to love them.

Loving them means that you have to get over the need to win, to prove yourself right. Get clear on the facts: If you are promoting personal liberty, true free will, true free speech, and so on, you are already right. You don’t have to prove anything. When you try to “prove” your rightness, you get dragged into their “winning” game, and you slide into their pit.

The people who fight you are trying to keep their mental universes free of contradiction. They haven’t the courage to see past their fences; they are defending their dogma from your heresy.

Your job is to speak the truth, to take their shots, and to smile. It doesn’t matter that they are flat wrong; so were you at one time.

Love them. Help them see. Don’t rush them. Let them come to you.

And when the loudmouth plays his game, tell him he’s an attack artist, substituting gorilla-style dominance for human understanding. Then smile and walk away.

We Are the Heretics

I dedicated a full issue of my monthly newsletter (FMP #58) to the subject of successful heresy, and I certainly can’t go through much of it here, but I would like you to understand that we are heretics to the majority culture, to the brainwashed culture. We cannot expect them to simply come along at our first statement of truth. Agreeing with us is far more than an act of reason; it is an act of courage… and people require time to work up to that.

So, don’t get sucked into heated debates. You’re the outsider, and you shouldn’t argue inside their frameworks. When they hit you with a barrage or with a “gotcha” question, step back, slow down, and examine what they’re actually saying. You don’t have to respond in 14 milliseconds. That’s a trap.

As the outsider, you should be addressing their root premises, not the political argument de jour. Such arguments seldom accomplish anything. Let them jump into their political furors while you keep addressing deep principles and things that “are not to be questioned.”

In other words, go ahead and be the heretic – they’re going to punish you for it anyway.

In the End…

In the end, we don’t speak to other people so we can convert them, and certainly not to prove we’re right, or (God forbid) to assemble a movement.

And, honestly, talking to people isn’t even about freeing life to flourish on this planet, as right a goal as that may be. When we talk to people, we are already expressing life… presentlynow… not “after we win.”

When you speak to people with love – in honest concern for their wellbeing – you are directly creating a better world, right now, word by word.

Do it.

Paul Rosenberg
www.freemansperspective.com

History is Written for the Suckers

history museumIt’s often said that history is written by the victors. I don’t think that is entirely true, but I can definitely tell you who history is written for, and that’s the suckers.

I’m referring to the history books people are forced to read in schools, by the way, not to serious and specialized history books. (The kind that almost no one reads.)

What brought up this subject was a comment I stumbled upon this morning, in a Wikipedia article about the origins of banking:

Wealth was deposited and kept in temples; in treasuries, where safety was afforded by the will of the gods.

I’ve actually studied ancient Mesopotamia, and I don’t for a minute believe that the guys who looted their local farmers believed it was protected by the gods. If they did, they wouldn’t have kept it in the most secure building in their kingdom, surrounded by thick walls and isolated from approach!

That line – that five thousand year old line – was created for the suckers, the people who gave the thugs their money but wanted to feel noble about it. And it’s still working! The ruler is automatically afforded every benefit of the doubt, at all times and in all ways.

History – at 3000 BC and even now – is written for the suckers: the people who maintain that eternal benefit of the doubt.

A Day at the British Museum

Let me explain how this works:

Several years ago, as I was completing a book on history called Production Versus Plunder, I visited the British Museum in London. There were some particular artifacts I wanted to see again, and I wanted to walk around and consider all the museum’s pieces of history: to see if there was anything important that I had overlooked or misrepresented.

On the second floor, where the most ancient artifacts are displayed, I found a sign entitled The First Cities. The text on this sign expressed the definitive mythology of ancient history, as it is now taught worldwide. It read:

This required organization and administration… With expansion came social differentiation and the development of an appropriate bureaucratic infrastructure, required to initiate and oversee the necessary public building programs.

This text was written for suckers, and it is simply false. Among other things, organization followed the creation of civilization, and public building programs came long, long after. (We covered a massive refutation of this sign in FMP #37.)

Signs like this on museum walls are written to justify the rulership of their place and time, to make it seem like the ultimate and inevitable end of human development. (Museums are nearly always suck-ups to their local ruler.)

I Could Go On

I have stories about other museums (and others about textbooks), but they’re not important just now. What is important is this base fact: The history you learned through approved channels was mainly propaganda. Its purpose was to hold you as a docile, obedient cog in their machine… a sucker.

I’ll close with two relevant quotes. The first from journalist H. L. Mencken:

The plain fact is that education is itself a form of propaganda – a deliberate scheme to outfit the pupil, not with the capacity to weigh ideas, but with a simple appetite for gulping ideas ready-made. The aim is to make ‘good’ citizens, which is to say, docile and uninquisitive citizens.

And another from educator John Taylor Gatto:

The truth is that schools don’t really teach anything except how to obey orders. This is a great mystery to me because thousands of humane, caring people work in schools as teachers and aides and administrators, but the abstract logic of the institution overwhelms their individual contributions.

Remember that no one – no person, no group – is entitled to a permanent benefit of the doubt. That is mere servility, and it is inappropriate for any thinking being.

Paul Rosenberg
FreemansPerspective.com

Embracing Adventure and Danger

childrenOne of the worst things that has been done to children over the past generation or two has been insulating them from anything that could possibly have any danger attached. Parents keeping their children under permanent watch has become “what people do.” And it’s a BIG mistake.

I know why the parents have done this, of course – we live in a fear-based culture, and it has rubbed off on them. But the reason they have caved in to fear is not important – what matters is that they have harmed their children.

Children – at some point in their upbringing – need to confront danger; they need to explore; they need adventures.

At one time, parents knew this. It wasn’t too many years ago when parents let their kids go off into the woods by themselves, with rifles. If that was really so horribly dangerous, half of us wouldn’t be here.

Is it scary to watch your children walk into a subway station? Or out into the woods? You bet it is! But you have to do it anyway. Calculate the risks, pick your times, pick your spots, watch them from a distance if you must, but let them go out and face the world.

Remember, fear is merely an impulse, and it can be based on lies, distortions, or even on nothing at all. It’s a crazy thing on which to base your children’s lives.

A new German study shows clearly that adventure shapes the individual. As one of the researchers concluded, “Living our lives makes us who we are.” Your children need to live, and not merely exist inside of a fear-inspired bubble. The study also indicates that exploration and adventure not only affect personality development, but also brain growth.

I’m not alone in this opinion, of course. Here are two quotes from John Taylor Gatto, a home school advocate and one of the finest teachers of modern times (one of the most awarded too, ironically enough):

Sensible children do not wish to be incomplete human beings. And so, when you impose a stage theory of human development upon them, you are, in effect, tormenting them; you’re limiting their opportunity… Don’t be your kid’s enemy, because that’s not a kid, that’s your fellow human being. Be a partner, and enlarge their opportunities.

The easiest way to turn your kids into geniuses, by the time they’re seven, is just to front-load huge amounts of experience, including dangerous experience.

Like Gatto, I believe that the real dangers for your children lie in government schools, and even in private schools that function on the same model. Here’s what Gatto says on the subject:

Growth and mastery come only to those who vigorously self-direct. Initiating, creating, doing, reflecting, freely associating, enjoying privacy—these are precisely what the structures of schooling are set up to prevent, on one pretext or another.

Yes, I understand that people are pushed, economically, to put their children into public schools. If you feel like you’re in that position, make sure that you tell your children how the system is set up to condition them. Teach them that understanding is far more important than memorizing. Back them up if the teachers give them grief. Let people talk about you.

Your children should understand, very clearly, that teachers and principals are just average people doing particular jobs; that they are merely another neighbor to the people on their street. Some of them are good people, others are bad people, and a title is just a title – it means nothing more.

Teach your children to be bold, let them learn how to fall and rise again. Of course you want to let them encounter dangers slowly, and you’d never put them in positions to get truly hurt, but you should be nothing like the über-parents who surveil their children’s every move, in terror that poor little Johnny will encounter something that hasn’t been sanitized for his protection.

I’ll leave you with one last quote from John Taylor Gatto: something that applies both to schooling and the larger world:

After a long life, and thirty years in the public school trenches, I’ve concluded that genius is as common as dirt. We suppress our genius only because we haven’t yet figured out how to manage a population of educated men and women. The solution, I think, is simple and glorious. Let them manage themselves.

Resist the fear, my friends.

Paul Rosenberg
FreemansPerspective.com

I’m sorry

student loanDear young people of America,

I’m sorry. You’re entering a world that has condemned you to slavery before you were even born. No, not the full-blown, work-in-the-fields slavery you learned about in school, but something that has most of the same effects but looks far better: they take half of your life and expect you to thank them for it.

There are actually several parts to your slavery. Today I am speaking of the part you may know best: inescapable student loans.

Matt Taibbi of Rolling Stone calls student loan programs “a shameful and oppressive outrage that for years now has been systematically perpetrated against a generation of young adults.”

Taibbi is right, of course, but I think he’s being mild. So, let me be more blunt:

Millions of young Americans have been forced into debt slavery.

Please understand that I am writing for accuracy here, not flamboyance. If you are in student loan debt, you were pushed and you are being held and it is slavery.

Yes, it’s true that you shouldn’t have signed those papers and spent that money, but – and please understand that I speak as a hard core advocate of personal responsibility – the guilt is mostly not yours.

Here’s why I say that:

Setup #1: Something is wrong with you if you don’t

Answer this question: How many times, between kindergarten and the end of high school were you told that you should or must go to college?

Hundreds maybe? And how many times was it simply implied than any decent kid (you in particular) would certainly go to college. Maybe hundreds more?

Setup #2: You’ll live a second-rate life if you don’t

It was clearly and repetitively implied that without a college degree, you’d be left to a second-rate job, a second-rate life and a second-rate spouse. No, they may not have said that explicitly (or they might have), but isn’t that what you were made to feel?

Think about it:

  1. You were conditioned to believe that getting the best girl/guy required you to go to a university.
  2. You were forced to make this choice at 17 years old, just as a flood of hormones had entered your life (making clear decisions much, much harder).
  3. College costs a fortune, but by merely signing a piece of paper, you got all the free money you needed and a clear shot at the mate of your dreams (not to mention lots of wild parties).

Setup #3: “Sign here and it’s all yours”

Here’s how it went:

  • They made you believe that you needed a degree in order to succeed in life.
  • They passed laws that forbade you from getting a good job without an authorized certificate.
  • They made sure that you could only get the certificates through them.

Then, of course, they raised their prices, offered you loans, made sure you could never escape those loans, and pushed you into a decision. You could either sign for the loan – before the deadline – or accept a second-rate life.

That’s called manipulation. In fact, it’s heavy-handed manipulation. A business contract signed under those conditions would be negated by any reasonable judge or jury.

“They Couldn’t Have Done It All On Purpose”

Yeah, they could have, and they did. I know that’s a horrifying thought, but take a look at these quotes from the founding of government schooling in America:

Here’s what Johann Gottlieb Fichte, the founding father of public education, said in his book “The General Nature of the New Education”:

If you want to influence him [the student] at all, you must do more than merely talk to him; you must fashion him, and fashion him in such a way that he simply cannot will otherwise than you wish him to will.

And here’s what William Torrey Harris, former United States Commissioner of Education, wrote in 1906:

Ninety-nine [students] out of a hundred are automata [i.e. robots], careful to walk in prescribed paths, careful to follow the prescribed custom. This is not an accident but the result of substantial education, which, scientifically defined, is the subsumption of the individual.

Just to show that I’m not picking aberrant statements, here’s one more, from Edward A. Ross, who, I am told, was a favorite of President Teddy Roosevelt:

The role of the public official, and in particular of the public school teacher, is to collect little plastic lumps of human dough from private households and shape them on the social kneadingboard.

Make no mistake: you were conditioned by professionals – 6 hours per day, 5 days per week, 40 weeks per year, between the ages of 5 and 18.

No, Mrs. Jones, your wonderful 6th grade teacher wasn’t out to manipulate you, but the people who built the system that controlled both of you were. She just did her best within that system. (And you should be thankful for her.)

Who Did This to You

It’s amazing to realize just how often the people who abuse you are the ones you’ve been taught to respect. And that’s certainly the case here. Your abusers are the majesties of the age:

The education system: We’ve already explained the conditioning of the K-12 system, and the abuses of “higher education” are pretty obvious. Who really thinks that a single class is worth a thousand dollars, or even five hundred? (I’ll ignore the arrogance and abuse of tenured professors for now.)

Higher education is designed to bleed you and your family dry. They have the magic piece of paper that makes or breaks your life, and you’ll do anything to get it.

Politicians: It’s ridiculous to blame parties on this: Blue and Red both play by the same book.

Both political parties have sold you down the river, and they’d do it again. Who do you think wrote and passed the law that you can’t get rid of a student loan even in bankruptcy?

Think about what that means: The loan stays with you for life. And when you die, the banker holding the debt gets first crack at your estate. This is truly a form of debtor’s prison.

The big banks: When you accept a loan from a bank, they don’t take money from someone else’s savings account – they merely write the number on the line and hit Enter – the money is created right there and then. (There’s too much to explain in detail, but that’s the essence of it.)

So, if they created your loan money with the stroke of an Enter key, how is it that they should make you work like a dog to keep up with the payments, make you worry every day for decades, and then take whatever remains from your children when you die?

Look it up if you’re not sure I’m being fair on this point: Get a copy of The Creature From Jekyll Island and read it.

You’ve been abused, my young friends. Sure, walking away from those loan papers would have been a good idea, but your entire life set you up to fold when you were squeezed into that situation.

And make no mistake: the people who conditioned you and wrote the laws and who now squeeze you for money… they knew what they were doing. The situation is confusing from the perspective of the 18 year old, but it isn’t from the perspective of the 55 year old.

These people may have sold you out to maintain their position, to make more money, or merely to keep their bosses happy. But they did sell you out.

What to Do?

First of all, forgive yourself. Yes, you could have done better – and you should never do anything like that again – but you were an 18 or 20 year old kid, facing off against 40, 50, and 60 year old specialists.

Secondly, don’t accept what was done to you as anything but abuse. Call it abuse and don’t back down. There’s nothing communistic or anti-market about that. Manipulation and fraud are not ‘capitalist’ things – they are crimes.

Don’t give the people who did this to you the benefit of the doubt. Once they release you from your financial prison you can think about it, but not until. They did NOT have good intentions, and it WASN’T okay.

Finally, it’s time for you to stop complaining and start doing. Find ways around the abuse; build new systems; act in some productive direction; then adapt as better choices appear.

You have as much intelligence and resourcefulness as any generation that came before you. Use it!

Paul Rosenberg
FreemansPerspective.com

How I Discovered The Hidden Side of History

Hidden History - Freeman's Perspective1981: I was looking through some old books that somehow ended up at my parents’ house. Among them, I found a set of history books from the 1930s. With an innate interest in the topic, I began reading them, and was absolutely shocked by what I found.

The last book of the series covered what were then modern times, and to my horror, I found lavish praise for – of all people – Benito Mussolini.

These were American books, by the way, beautifully produced by a respected publisher. And there, in authoritative tones, was the story of the great Mussolini, the savior of Italy. Given that I was taught precisely the opposite, a mere 30-odd years later, you can imagine my surprise.

Just to establish my point, here are a few quotes from that time about Mussolini:

What a man! I have lost my heart!
– Winston Churchill

The greatest genius of the modern age.
– Thomas Edison

I am much interested and deeply impressed by what he has accomplished and by his evidenced honest purpose of restoring Italy.
– Franklin Roosevelt

Obviously, these quotes are no longer mentioned in ‘respectable’ circles. And that’s my point: What is inconvenient to the current ruling establishment is dropped from the books.

When I was young, the USSR was famous for horribly twisting history to make themselves look like the great and mighty ones. They even made jokes about it on the original Star Trek. But here was clear evidence that history – in America – had been altered. In this case, parts had not been added, but they most certainly had been taken away. That rather shook my view of history, as it had been taught to me at school.

The Making of… Hidden History

A few years later I came across an even more troubling instance of history being pulled out of the books:

I had been writing a few books for a major publisher, and one of my editors asked me to meet him for dinner, which, of course, I did. We discussed projects that we might pursue and generally had a pleasant evening. At some point we left off discussing our projects and talked about history. Somehow, we ended up at the Armenian genocide. He was surprised that I knew about it (many still don’t), but I had known quite a few Armenian kids growing up, and I had heard their stories.

Then, my editor took a deep breath and said, “then I want to tell you something.” He explained that a few years before, he had been working for one of the big three textbook publishers, and happened to be editing a high school history book. One day, he got a phone call from the US State Department. He was shocked, and asked them why they would be calling him. “It’s about the history book you’re editing,” the man said.

My friend had been raised in about the same way I had, so the idea of censoring a textbook was astonishing to him. “We need you to cut back the section on the Armenian genocide,” the man from the State Department said. My friend was horrified, and complained that it was the true history. “Yes,” said the man, “but we need to keep the Turks happy.” My friend’s 2-3 pages on the Armenian genocide was reduced to 2-3 paragraphs, and it was a victory that he got that much space.

According to all I learned in school, such things did not happen in America. According to all that is self-promoted about academia, they are the sworn enemies of such things. But they do happen – a lot.

I’ve encountered the same thing on museum walls: descriptions that are clearly misleading, but which glorify the rulership of our time.

There is much more to this, but I’ll let the point stand as I’ve made it thus far: History is manipulated. You can find the truth if you dig through old books and artifact records, or from some specialists, but not from schoolbooks. The books aren’t filled with lies, they just remove the facts that don’t make their bosses look good.

And this is not a trivial thing; it affects a lot more than school children. As Adolf Hitler was starting his aggression against the Poles, the London Times quoted him as saying: Go, kill without mercy. After all, who remembers the Armenians?

What is deleted from history can teach us nothing, and those who have this power use it to glorify themselves. This is a very dangerous thing, and it rules the schoolbooks of America and the Western world in general.

I’ll close with a line from Paul Simon’s song, Kodachrome:

When I think back on all the crap I learned in high school,
it’s a wonder I can think at all.

What you learned in school was a partial, cartoon version of history. You learned what made the big bosses look good, and no more.

Paul Rosenberg
FreemansPerspective.com